The Globe

Issue 1 2015

First Minister “vigorously” to defend minimum unit price

Issue 2 2014

BRAZIL: An unregulated alcohol market

The global burden of disease is 6.5% for men and 1.3% for women, while the alcohol-attributable burden of disease in the two regions of the Americas which include most of the Latin American countries varies between 8.6% and 17.3% for men and 2.2% and 4.1% for women. Read more…

Issue 1 2014

World Cancer Report 2014 Rising Burden of Cancer – Prevention the Key – Derek Rutherford reviews the World Cancer Report 2014.

In a Foreward to the Report Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director General, writes: “The rising burden of cancer and other NCDs places enormous strain on the health care systems of developing countries, many of which are ill equipped to cope with the escalation in the number of people with cancer. Developing countries find themselves in the grip of cancers from two vastly different worlds. The world of poverty and the world of plenty.” Read more…

Issue 3 2013

Beware of the Alcohol Industry Bearing Gifts

The WHO has produced a first draft of a Global Coordinating Mechanism for noncommunicable diseases (GCM). Commenting on the draft, the Global Alcohol Producers Group has stated that its, “companies are deeply committed to continuing to work with WHO, Member States and other stakeholders to combat the harmful use of alcohol and the growing problem of noncommunicable diseases.” Read more…

Issue 2 2013

Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General urges strong alcohol policies

The Turkish Green Crescent Society held an Alcohol Policy Symposium in Istanbul in April 2013. Dr Margaret Chan, Director- General of the World Health Organization, addressed the symposium. Here we re-produce a slightly shortened version of her address. Read more…

Issue 1 2013

Alcohol grows as risk factor for death and disability in 2010 GBD Study

On December 14, 2012, The Lancet together with the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) hosted an event at the Royal Society in London to present the findings of the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010. The launch of the 2010 GBD Study featured discussion of comparable estimates of mortality, causes of death, years lived with disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 291 conditions and 67 risk factors, for 21 regions and three time periods – 1990, 2005, and 2010. The results reveal substantial shifts in the burden of disease from children to younger adults, from premature mortality to morbidity and disability, from communicable, maternal, neonatal and nutritional conditions to noncommunicable diseases. Read more…

Issue 3 2012

65th World Health Assembly: Steps taken towards reducing NCDs: but no specific alcohol target

Following on from recommendations made in the Political Declaration of the UN General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of non-communicable diseases [NCDs], representatives from 194 Member States met in May at the 65th World Health Assembly to discuss suitable proposals for measuring their prevention and control, in line with the World Health Organization’s [WHO] global comprehensive monitoring framework. Read more…

Issue 2 2012

Global Alcohol Policy Conference 13-15 February 2012, Nonthaburi, Thailand Opening Ceremony

At the opening ceremony the voice of Thai children rang out a simple but apt message to the delegates that at local, national and regional level “ACTION IS NEEDED” to change from “HARM TO HOPE” and that “TOGETHER WE CAN”. Read more…

Issue 1 2012

Youth Empowerment

WHO estimates that 320,000 young people between the ages of 15 and 29 die from alcohol related causes. This represents 9% of all deaths in that age group. Alcohol is the world’s leading risk factor for all deaths of males 15 – 59. Read more…

Issue 3 2011

UNITED NATIONS ADOPT POLITICAL DECLARATION ON NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

Alcohol identified as a major cause of a global ‘slow motion disaster’ Read more…

Issue 2 2011

Alcohol and Cancer in the spotlight

Studies in Europe and Australia confirm alcohol as a cause of cancer, but role of moderate drinking controversial Read more…

Issue 1 2011

ALCOHOL AND NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

Addressing harmful use of alcohol is essential to realising the goals of the UN Resolution on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Read more…

Issue 3 2010

Alcohol, HIV and Public Health

The 2nd International Conference on Alcohol and HIV hosted by the International Center for Research on Women was held in New Delhi in September 2010 Read more…

Issue 2 2010

TEN YEARS OF GAPA HONOURED

The Global Alcohol Policy Alliance was formed in Syracuse in August 2000. The international conference drew 240 representatives from 28 countries. It was sponsored by WHO, Institute of Alcohol Studies and Marin Institute and financially supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Alliance House Foundation. Read more…

Issue 1 2010

Global Alcohol Strategy Endorsed

“The global strategy for reducing the harmful use of alcohol is a true breakthrough”, stated Dr Margaret Chan, Director of the World Health Organization, after delegations from all 193 Member States had reached consensus on the resolution ‘Strategies to reduce the harmful use of alcohol’. Read more…

Issue 3 2009

Global Alcohol Strategy on the right track

After more than 20 years on the periphery alcohol was put centre stage in global public health in 2005 when the 58th World Health Assembly (WHA) passed the resolution, “Public health problems caused by harmful use of alcohol” (WHA58.26). This move was not free from controversy and an attempt to pass a new resolution in 2007 failed due to the opposition of some Member States. In May 2008, the Members States were again able to reach consensus on a new alcohol resolution, this time drafted by the group of African countries. This resolution called for a WHO-sponsored Global Strategy to Reduce Harmful Use of Alcohol (WHA61.4). Read more…

Issue 2 2009

AROUND 1 IN 25 DEATHS WORLDWIDE ATTRIBUTABLE TO ALCOHOL

Worldwide, 1 in 25 deaths and 5% of years lived with disability are attributable to alcohol consumption. Disease burden is closely related to average volume of alcohol consumption, and, for every unit of exposure, is strongest in poor people and in those who are marginalised from society. These are among the conclusions of the first in a Series of three papers on alcohol in a recent edition of the UK medical journal, The Lancet. The paper on global mortality was written by Dr Jürgen Rehm, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada, and colleagues. Read more…

Issue 1 2009

GAPA Chairman receives “Lifetime Achievement Award”

The Fourth National Conference on Alcohol organised by the Thai Health Promotion Foundation took place in Bangkok in December 2008. Over 900 delegates attended from Thailand together with a number of international guests. A special award from the Royal Thai Government was given to Derek Rutherford. Read more…

Issue 2 2008

A new voice in the field of Alcohol Policy

The first youth network on alcohol policy was established in Budapest, from 28th – 30th March: The Alcohol Policy Youth Network (APYN). Read more…

Issue 1 2008 & 3 2007

Vigilance required over WHO collaboration with the drinks industry on a global strategy

This issue of The Globe is published at a crucial juncture in the effort to secure a Global Strategy to Reduce the Harmful Effects of Alcohol. Between now and May 2008, when the World Health Assembly will consider the resolution adopted by the Executive Board on 23rd January 2008, global advocates for alcohol policies will need to come to a collective decision to support the process and the resolution as it stands, or seek to amend the request to the Director General to‘collaborate’ with the‘economic operators’ by replacing it with ‘to consult with the drinks industry’ on ways they could contribute to reducing harmful use of alcohol. Read more…

Issue 2 2007 & 1 2007

WHO Global assessment of public-health problems caused by harmful use of alcohol for 2002

Alcohol is ranked as the fifth leading risk factor for premature death and disability causing considerable public health problems. Read more…

Issue 3 2006

World Bank calls for action on youth and alcohol

Raising prices through taxation, comprehensive bans on advertising and product promotions, age restrictions on sales and prominent health warnings on alcohol are called for by the World Bank in its World Development Report 2007*. Read more…

Issue 2 2006

Comment

We highlight a report ‘Alcohol in Europe: A Public Health Perspective’ commissioned by DG SANCO and prepared by the Institute of Alcohol Studies. The report estimates that the tangible cost of alcohol to the EU is 125 billion Euros, that is 1.3% of GDP. More importantly the cost of suffering (intangible) places a further cost of 270 billion Euros. 115,000 Europeans die each year from an alcohol-related cause. Up to 9 million children are living in families adversely affected by alcohol. Read more…

Issue 1 2006 & 3 2005

Alcohol Advocacy – Lessons to be learned from tobacco

Monika Arora, Director, HRIDAY (Health Related Information Dissemination Amongst Youth), New Delhi, India. Like tobacco, alcohol is also a public health hazard. Tobacco has adverse effects on social, economic, health and environmental factors. Alcohol too has adverse medical, psychological, social and economic impacts. Other similar characteristics between alcohol and tobacco are its increasing social acceptability, dependence on the product, aggressive marketing of the product particularly to recruit youth as its consumers. Read more…

Issue 2 2005

Indian Alcohol Policy Alliance launched

Dr Hariharan, Chief Executive reports: The newly established Indian Alcohol Policy Alliance (IAPA) was launched in New Delhi in May this year. Read more…

Issue 1 2005

Editorial

Recognition that the world is facing an alcohol epidemic affecting every continent is evidenced from the WHO Global Burden of Disease. Globally alcohol causes 3.2 per cent of death and 4 per cent of ill health and disability. Thomas Babor comments: ‘No other product so widely available for consumer use, not even tobacco, accounts for as much disability as alcohol. Read more…

Issue 3 2004

Focus on Youth Drinking

The ESPAD Report 2003, Alcohol and Other Drug Use Among Students in 35 European Countries, Read more…

Issue 2 2004 & 1 2004

Bridging the Gap

Nearly 400 participants from 32 countries gathered in Warsaw in June for the Bridging the Gap conference, a major initiative sponsored and organised by Eurocare with the financial support of the European Commission. Co-sponsors included the World Health Organisation, the European Cultural Foundation and the Polish State Agency for Prevention of Alcohol Problems. Read more…

Issue 4 2003

World Bank pronounces on Alcohol

The World Bank has released a fact sheet on alcohol, as part of its “Public Health at a Glance” series of summaries that aim to provide World Bank staff and others with quick, easy access to the state of the art in key areas of public health, preventive and curative services. The fact sheet is designed to be useful to project teams in the Bank and to others making investment decisions designed to improve health and nutrition. Read more…

Issue 3 2003

Alcohol: No Ordinary Commodity. A summary of the book – Alcohol & Public Policy Group

Alcohol Policy and The Public Good, published in 1994, was a modern landmark in alcohol policy. Here, with the kind permission of the editor of the journal Addiction, we reproduce a summary of its successor, Alcohol: No Ordinary Commodity — Research and public policy (Babor et al. 2003). The first part of the book describes why alcohol is no ordinary commodity, and presents epidemiological data on the global burden of alcohol-related problems. The second part of the book reviews the scientific evidence for strategies and interventions designed to prevent or minimise alcohol-related harm: pricing and taxation, regulating the physical availability of alcohol, modifying the drinking context, drinking-driving counter measures, regulating alcohol promotion, education and persuasion strategies and treatment services. The final section considers the policy making process on the local, national and international levels, and provides a synthesis of evidence-based strategies and interventions from a policy perspective. Read more…

Issue 2 2003

Alcohol related brain damage on the rise

to provide health promotion and prevention by increasing public awareness and to provide health promotion literature for young people, adults and older people. (There is no evidence that health promotion or information makes much impact on any aspect of people’s drinking behaviour other than drink driving.) Read more…

Issue 1 2003

Advocacy in action

Since its inception at the Global Alcohol Policy Conference in Syracuse, NY, in the summer of 2000, the Global Alcohol Policy Alliance (GAPA) has set itself the task of co-ordinating the work of advocates around the world. Read more…

Issue 4 2002

Living dangerously: The World Health Report, 2002

Global alcohol consumption has increased in recent decades, with most or all of this increase occurring in developing countries, according to The World Health Report 2002, published recently by the World Health Organization. Throughout the world, alcohol caused 1.8 million deaths, equal to 4 per cent of the global disease burden – the highest proportion being in the Americas and Europe. It is estimated that worldwide, alcohol caused between 20 and 30 per cent of all oesophagal cancer, liver disease, epilepsy, motor vehicle accidents, and homicide and other intentional injuries. Read more…

Issue 3 2002

Editorial

The beverage alcohol industry’s social aspects organizations: A public health warning Read more…

Issue 2 2002

Drinking it in – Marketing and Promotion of Alcohol to Young People

Against a background of lobbying and public relations exercises on the part of the drink industry, the Valencia conference, Drinking it in: Marketing and Promotion of Alcohol to Young People, looked at the reality of the industry’s methods of targeting the next generation of drinkers worldwide. The conference was intended as a follow-up to the Ministerial Conference held in Stockholm in February, 2001. In his opening statement to the conference, Derek Yach, Executive Director, WHO, said: “New data to be released by WHO in the World Health Report later this year, shows that the burden of alcohol on mortality and morbidity has significantly increased since last reported in 1990. Back then, alcohol was already responsible for around 3.5 per cent of all deaths and disease in the world. Read more…

Issue 1 2002

The International Center for Alcohol Policies:

Around the world, the beverage alcohol industry, in its determination to avoid the fate of the tobacco industry, is making strenuous efforts to influence public opinion and government policy on alcohol issues. It promotes ‘social aspect groups’ which purport to address the problems of alcohol abuse. Here, Peter Anderson and Derek Rutherford critically examine the work of the two main international groups: ICAP based in Washington DC and the Amsterdam Group in Europe Read more…

Issue 4 2001 & 3 2001

Gapa Bangkok consultation: Alcohol in Asia – Foreward

The 2001 No 4 edition of The Globe was held over in order to report the papers which were presented from nine countries at the GAPA Asia/Pacific region consultation meeting. Participants were asked to prepare background papers on their national situation in relation to alcohol consumption and problems, together with illustrative material of the marketing tactics of the alcohol industry in their country. Read more…

Issue 2 2001

Trade treaties, alcohol and public health

There was a time when it was not necessary to pay much attention to trade treaties. Read more…

Issue 1 2001

WHO challenges the drink industry

The drink industry needs to clean up its act and realise that its product poses a health threat to the young people of Europe. This was the message which came firmly out of the Ministerial Conference on Young People and Alcohol held in Stockholm in February. The Conference was attended by delegations from the health ministries of all the countries of the WHO European Region. Read more…