New report on alcohol industry activities in Latin America and the Caribbean

Alcohol industry in Latin America and Caribbean
English version

New Report exposes growing influence of the alcohol industry in the Latin America and Caribbean region

Alcohol industry also proactively leveraging the COVID-19 pandemic under the guise of  Corporate Social Responsibility

Thursday, 27 August, 2020 (Mexico City, Mexico)– The rapidly growing disabilities and death arising from the harmful use of alcohol in the Latin America and the Caribbean Region (LAC) is a direct result of  a series of deliberate tactics by the alcohol industry to influence and undermine government policy aimed at  regulating the marketing, advertising and sale of alcohol at safe levels a new report has revealed.

The Alcohol industry´s Commercial and political  Activities in Latin America and the Caribbean: Implications for Public Health was released today by  four civil society organisations working in the noncommunicable disease sector: theNCD Alliance (NCDA),  the Global Alcohol Policy Alliance (GAPA), the Healthy Latin America Coalition (CLAS), and the Healthy Caribbean Coalition (HCC). The report is also available in Spanish.

Spanish version

The  report describes the role of the alcohol  industry in influencing regional policies that affect public health and social welfare, using tactics that resemble those of other unhealthy commodity industries such as ultra-processed food, sugar-sweetened beverage, and tobacco, which are far more frequently exposed and challenged in LAC.

“This report  shows how the alcohol industry works in tandem to oppose effective alcohol policies and actively engage in strategic practices that compromise public health in the region, said   Professor Thomas Babor of  the University of Connecticut School of Medicine  and a lead author. It provides evidence and analysis of how health policy is undermined by vested interests, most recently in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

“This report  is sounding the alarm bells  – the alcohol industry is moving into fertile ground in theLatin America and the Caribbean,” said Katie Dain, CEO of the NCD Alliance.

“International alcohol producers are looking to middle- income countries to bolster their future profits, relying heavily on advertising and other marketing efforts to ease their expansion into these ‘emerging markets.”

“Urgent action is needed across the region if we are to put a brake on the industry´s  relentless leveraging of the tourist industry as an entry point to the Caribbean’s small island developing states, said Sir Trevor Hassel, President of the Healthy Caribbean Coalition

Alcohol consumption is particularly high in Latin America and the Caribbean countries and territories (LAC). According to data from the World Health Organization’s Global Health Observatory, Latin America’s consumption of 6.5 liters of pure alcohol annually per capita makes it the third highest region in the world, after Europe at 10.1 and North America at 9.9 litres.

However some countries within the region, such as Grenada and Saint Lucia, are higher at 9.5 and 10.6, respectively (World Health Organization [WHO], 2020]. Total adult per capita consumption in Central and South America has increased over the past 40 years. In Brazil, which ranks among the largest beer producers worldwide, consumption has almost tripled since the 1960s.

Rising rates of alcohol consumption, as well as binge drinking patterns among young people have contributed to the increasing burden of disease and injuries in Latin America and the Caribbean. The harmful use of alcohol is a leading risk factor for death and disability in the LAC Region, particularly among males (Pan American Health Organization, 2015). Alcohol use is the leading risk factors for disability-adjusted life-years among men in Latin America.

The activities of the industry that have implications for public health were found to be diverse, multifaceted, and widespread in the LAC region. Commercial activities include the concentration  of  ownership  of alcohol brands and products by a small number of  transnational  alcohol   corporations,  and   use of sophisticated marketing techniques to target adolescents and other vulnerable groups. Strategies include information campaigns to achieve strategic objectives, constituency building, substituting ineffective for effective policies, using financial measures to influence favorable policies, and legal action. Tactics such as lobbying, image advertising, building strategic alliances, and litigation in the courts are used to influence industry-favorable policies in four key areas: alcohol availability, alcohol pricing and taxes, marketing regulations, and drink-driving countermeasures.

“Almost every country in Latin America and the Caribbean has been exposed to some of these tactics,“ said Beatriz Champagne, Coordinator  of the Healthy Latin America Coalition.“Far from being a passive supplier of alcohol products, the industry is actively involved in promoting demand for alcohol in order to increase sales and profits, particularly in new market segments like women and young adults.

This report provides strong evidence that the influence of the large transnational alcohol corporations on the policy environment is manifested through a network of major producers, proxy organizations and affiliated interest groups. Using strategies and tactics borrowed from the tobacco industry, public health measures have been difficult to implement even when there is strong scientific evidence of their effectiveness in reducing alcohol-related harm.

“For want of better alcohol policy, thousands of premature deaths and millions of disability-free life years lost could have been prevented but for the negative influence of the alcohol industry in LAC,“ said Øystein Bakke, Secretary of GAPA.

“The alcohol industry’s activities in the Region are compromising the work of public health community, the World Health Organization, and the NGOs working in the public health area to deal with the burden of disease attributable to alcohol. “

The report also highlights how some of the biggest players in the alcohol industry have proactively leveraged the COVID-19 pandemic under the guise of  Corporate Social Responsibility, citing the production and donation of alcohol-based hand sanitizers AB inBev and the provision by Mexico´s Grupo Modelo and Paraguay´s Cervepa of  a  free online ordering platform for home delivery services to more than 12,000 retailers.

Partnerships with other transnational corporations, especially the ultra processed food industry became commonplace in the pandemic. One example was “Movimento nós” (Movement us) that united  eight  corporations (including Ambev, Heineken, Coca-Cola and Pepsico) to assist 300,000 small retail stores in Brazil during the pandemic including the facilitating payment conditions and providing economic and COVID-related information.

Gender and Diversity Policy

Introduction
GAPA was established at the Global Alcohol Policy Conference in Syracuse, NY, USA, in 2000. Over the years, the board has been male dominated, but from 2015 it was chaired by a woman. Gender balance in GAPA governing bodies and its activities (Global Alcohol Policy Conferences, GAPA delegations etc.) has been a prime consideration. At GAPC 2020 in Dublin the list of plenary speakers and panellist showed an almost 50/50 division with a small majority of women.

From the outset the GAPA Objectives included a Low- and Middle-Income Countries perspective in that it expressed the ambition to:

  • Place priority on research and advocacy regarding those parts of the world where alcohol problems are increasing; and
  • Ensure that member groups in those areas have the technology and support capacity to participate in a global network for communication and action.

Further the GAPA By-Laws outline that

  • The Board of trustees shall consist of up to twenty members and shall be representative of all continents.

This Gender and Diversity Policy was passed by the GAPA Executive Board in March 2020 and includes what in many instances has been emerging practice over the years.

Gender equality and Diversity

Perspectives
GAPA recognises that gender is more than women and men, and that not everyone enjoys the same status, power or access to and control over resources. This situation is unacceptable. Principles of equity and social justice require us to ensure that everyone has equal opportunity for expressing and using their potential, irrespective of sex, gender identity and gender expression, age, race, colour, class, caste, religion, ethnic background, sexual orientation or disability. Likewise, there are great differences in the resources available around the world influencing to what extent voices and perspectives from these parts of the world come forward in the global arena such as the one GAPA is involved in.

Women are less likely than men to drink around the world. Still within this pattern there are big variations, and in some parts of the world the gender gap in the prevalence of alcohol use and heavy episodic drinking has become small or non-existent. However, elsewhere persisting cultural values still contribute to a general pattern of drinking in which men consume more alcohol and cause more problems by doing so than women. Alcohol is a causal contributor to intimate partner violence with disagreements more likely to become violent and injury to be worse if alcohol is involved. For women and children living in poverty the alcohol use by the husband and father may represent addition problems related to taking unproportioned part of the household expenditures, result in lack of income or catastrophic health expenditures.

Rationale
GAPA recognises that by not equally involving every person or excluding certain groups in its work, talents will be underutilised, and important perspectives will be lost. GAPA’s work in the Global Health arena will be strengthened by bringing in voices from different backgrounds; women and men; different parts of the world; different age and professions; different cultures and religions; minority groups etc. GAPA fully commits to channelling energy, effort and resources into processes that create an organisation that values all people equally and take this commitment also into the values for the society that GAPA is promoting through its advocacy.

GAPA principles for advocacy during WHO process to accelerate action to reduce the harmful use of alcohol 2020 – 2022

Following a decision at the World Health Organisation 146th Executive Board WHO started a two-year process to “accelerate action to reduce the harmful use of alcohol” . This includes a consultation towards an action plan 2022-2030 for the global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol; development of a technical report on the harmful use of alcohol related to cross-border alcohol marketing; a call for more resources to be made available; and a review of the Global strategy in 2030. Civil society has an important role to play in contributing to consultations and communicating with decision makers about what such an accelerated action will entail. GAPA and its global network will participate actively in the two-year process and beyond. Read “GAPA Principles for Advocacy 2020 – 2022” including the summary “GAPA’s key recommendations”.

GAPA online forum

Following the successful Global Alcohol Policy Conference in Dublin GAPA hosted a series of online discussions to reflect on themes arising from GAPC 2020. These moderated discussions ran from 1 April until 31 May 2020 on Workplace (an online platform similar to Facebook) where participants connected with like-minded alcohol policy advocates. Video recordings of the conference plenary sessions was made available for review and participants provided valuable input to inform GAPA’s future efforts to accelerate global progress in alcohol control.

GAPC 2020 in Dublin, Ireland

The 6th Global Alcohol Policy Conference (GAPC) was held in Dublin Ireland in early March, marking the 20th anniversary since the first GAPC. The event was held a week before most of Europe imposed severe restrictions due to the Covid-19 situation. Of the 412 registrations from 50 countries; 340 attended from 47 countries.

Health Minister, Simon Harris TD delivering opening address at Global Alcohol Policy Conference (GAPC) 2020
“When the public health lobby get together, we can achieve great things,” Minister of Health, Simon Harris TD said.

The conference was co-hosted by the Global Alcohol Policy Alliance (GAPA) and the Department of Health. The World Health Organization co-sponsored the event which was supported by a number of Irish Civil Society organisations. In his opening speech the Health Minister, Simon Harris TD, inspired the delegates to do the right thing and join Ireland in their important journey toward stronger alcohol policies. He described the extent of alcohol industry lobbying and media pressure to oppose the Public Health (Alcohol) Act and the important role played by civil society in ensuring its passage: “When the public health lobby get together, we can achieve great things,” Harris said.

Also speaking in the opening session Professor Jürgen Rehm reminded the audience that “we are completely not on track” and the situation is getting worse in LMICs which are targeted by the alcohol industry. Barriers to action are coming from the wealthy countries, perpetuating inequity in the global environment. Greater harm is also experienced by the more disadvantaged in high income countries. These findings support e the relevance of the conference theme: “Alcohol Equity and Global Health: the benefit of alcohol control for sustainable development for all.”

GAPC 2020 maintained the tradition of focusing on advocacy, overcoming vested interests in alcohol policy development and the need for international collaboration to stop the harm caused by alcohol. Seven plenaries, 26 concurrent sessions and five workshops were held during the three days.

GAPA Chair Professor Sally Casswell addressing GAPC 2020
GAPA Chair Professor Sally Casswell.

Said GAPA Chair, Professor Sally Casswell: “Despite good evidence of how to reduce harm, an adequate policy response is not being made. This due to a combination of industry interference, lack of political will and an ongoing ‘blindspot’ in global health governance.”

Participants in the conference congratulated the International Organising Committee for the diversity shown in plenary speakers in terms of gender and representation from many regions and countries of the world. In his plenary presentation, delivered by video (as some had to be given the Covid-19 situation), Dr Thaksaphon Thamarangsi, Director, Healthier Populations and Noncommunicable Diseases, WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia Region, reflected on the positive developments which have occurred in relation to alcohol policy referred to the Global Alcohol Policy Conference as an institution for alcohol policy.

GAPC handing over from 2020 to 2021 Cape Town, Sally Casswell, Denise Keogh, Joe Barry, Charles Parry, Maurice Smithers, Mandy Solomon,
Handing over the flag to the Global Alcohol Policy Conference 2021 in Cape Town. From GAPA, Professor Sally Casswell, from Ireland Denise Keogh and Joe Barry, from South Africa, Professor Charles Parry, Maurice Smithers and Mandy Solomon.

In closing the conference Professor David Jernigan pointed out that there was no conference declaration from GAPC 2020: “Your presence here is our declaration. We are here. We are not going away. We will not be stopped by an industry, or a virus, or an industry that uses viral marketing.”

Ongoing discussion among conference participants and other interested civil society actors will be taking place online, on the Workplace platform, beginning 1st April and all are welcome to register.

To get an idea of what delegates found interesting during the conference, the #gapc2020 hashtag on Twitter will give an idea.

The final session also saw the flag being handed over to the GAPC 2021 organisers. The next conference will be held in Cape Town, South Africa, 11-14 October 2021 co-hosted by South African Medical Research Council and the Southern African Alcohol Policy Alliance with GAPA.

GAPC 2020

GAPA position paper

24 October 2020 GAPA issued a position paper on the implementation of WHO’s global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol during the first decade since its endorsement, and the way forward. In this paper the GAPA highlights important elements for consideration and encourages its own network and the wider the global health community to take part in a web-based consultation conducted by the World Health Organization. The World Health Assembly in May 2019  requested the WHO Director-General “to report to the Seventy-third World Health Assembly in 2020, through the Executive Board, on the implementation of WHO’s global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol during the first decade since its endorsement, and the way forward”.  Comments from the consultation will be taken into consideration in the process of developing the above-mentioned report.

See more about the WHO web-based consultation, including the discussion paper and submission form, here.

Read the GAPA position paper here:

GAPC 2020 to be held in Dublin, Ireland

Sally Casswell, Chair of the Global Alcohol Policy Conference (GAPA), Simon Harris TD, Irish Minister of Health and Catherine Byrne TD, Minister of State for Health Promotion and the National Drugs Strategy, announced today that the 6th Global Alcohol Policy Conference 2020 (GAPC 2020) will be held in Dublin, Ireland 9-11 March 2020.

GAPC is the leading forum for the world’s alcohol policy makers, advocates, researchers, civil society activists and practitioners. Building on the strong commitment and recent alcohol policy interventions in the country, Ireland is the perfect host for GAPC 2020.

The conference in Ireland will have the theme: “Alcohol Equity and Global Health: the benefit of alcohol control for sustainable development for all.” It maintains the tradition of focusing on advocacy, overcoming vested interests in alcohol policy development and the need for international collaboration to stop the harm caused by alcohol.

Welcoming the announcement, Minister Harris said: “The enactment of the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill sent a message to the world that Ireland is serious about addressing the harms of alcohol in our country. That commitment has now been recognised by this invitation to host the next Global Alcohol Policy Conference. The conference will provide an excellent opportunity to reinforce the public health message about alcohol and to share best practice from across the world on addressing this important issue.”

Sally Casswell, Chair of GAPA says: “We are very enthusiastic about co-hosting the GAPC 2020 in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the alcohol policy NGO community in Ireland. It is a fitting acknowledgement of the great efforts made by the government of Ireland to reduce alcohol related harm. The need for evidence- based alcohol policies has never been more pronounced including in low and middle- income countries and we hope to raise funds to facilitate participation from around the world.  The conference is an opportunity to engage in fruitful discussions and exchange of ideas in a unique atmosphere, free from the vested interests of the alcohol industry. This is an important part of GAPA’s portfolio of activities aimed to fulfil our mission: to promote evidence- based alcohol policies free from commercial interest.”

The previous GAPCs were held in Melbourne, Australia in 2017; Edinburgh, Scotland (2015); Seoul, South Korea (2013); Bangkok, Thailand (2012); and Syracuse, USA (2000).  Civil society organisations, academic institutions, funding agencies and others free from any ties to the alcohol industry are invited to contact the organisers to explore co-sponsorship opportunities for the conference. 

Visit the GAPC 2020 conference website

PMAC Side meeting: Framework Convention on Alcohol Control: Why and How?

GAPA Chair Sally Casswell
GAPA Chair Sally Casswell opening the PMAC side meeting “Framework Convention on Alcohol Control: Why and How”

On 29 and 30 January, prior to the PMAC, GAPA co-hosted two side meetings. One was a half-day session on “Framework Convention on alcohol Control (FCAC): Why and How” together with IOGT International, Thai Health Promotion Foundation, Third World Network, International Health Policy Program, Thailand and National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol (NATA), Sri Lanka. Dough Webb from UNDP moderated and GAPA Chair Sally Casswell gave the main introduction in an event which also included the following speakers and panellists:

  • Professor Kumnuan, Thai Health/GAPA Board Member
  • Pubudu Sumanasekara, International Vice President, IOGT
  • International, GAPA Board member
  • Dr Palitha Abeykoon, NATA, Sri Lanka
  • Sanya Reid Smith, Third World Network
  • Øystein Bakke, GAPA Secretary
  • Tungamirai Zimonte, Board Member, IOGT International
  • Dr TRAN Tuan, Chairman Viet Nam Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention Alliance
  • Dr. Supreda, ThaiHealth, CE, Thai Health
  • Paula Johns, NCD Alliance Board Member, GAPA Board Member
  • Issah Ali, Executive Director, VALD, GAPA Board Member
  • Professor Robin Room, Researcher, La Trobe University, Melbourne

The room with a capacity of 50 people was overfilled; there were good presentations, active participation in group discussions and a good debate in the plenary.

In addition GAPA was involved as co-hosts in the side meeting “Advancing SAFER – the new WHO-led initiative to reduce alcohol related harm globally” together with United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on NCD, IOGT International, NCD Alliance and Vital Strategies.

GAPA activities at the Prince Mahidol Award Conference 2019

Interventions about alcohol policy received interest and was mentioned in social media

Several GAPA representatives participated in the Prince Mahidol Award Conference (PMAC) in Bangkok 31 January–3 February. Alcohol received quite a bit of attention in the conference and was mentioned by many speakers and in interventions from the floor, both in the plenary and parallel sessions as well as on Twitter (#PMAC2019).

GAPA Chair, Professor Sally Casswell spoke in the plenary session “Address Determinants of NCD: the Whole of Government and Systems Response”, and in the parallel session, “Building Ethical Systems for Public Interest in the National Response to NCDs”. In addition Ms Aadielah Maker Diedericks from the Southern African Alcohol Policy Alliance spoke in the parallel session about Commercial Determinants of Health and the experience from alcohol situation in South Africa.

Any mention of alcohol also seemed to be well received by the audience. Many new, young voices have taken this up in social media.

Professor Sally Casswell spoke in the plenary session “Address Determinants of NCD: the Whole of Government and Systems Response”

Alcohol was also mentioned in the PMAC Conference statement:

“Recognizing that alcohol remains the only psychoactive and dependence-producing substance with significant global impact on population health that is not controlled at the international level by legally-binding regulatory frameworks; that although evidence is available on the most cost-effective ‘best buy’ actions which include increasing taxes on alcoholic beverages, enacting and enforcing bans or comprehensive restrictions on exposure to alcohol advertising across all types of media, and enacting and enforcing restrictions on the physical availability of retailed alcohol; these are yet to be fully implemented;”

Side meeting: Framework Convention on Alcohol Control: Why and How?

GAPA Chair Sally Casswell

GAPA Chair Sally Casswell opening the PMAC side meeting “Framework Convention on Alcohol Control: Why and How”

On 29 and 30 January, prior to the PMAC, GAPA co-hosted two side meetings. One was a half-day session on “Framework Convention on alcohol Control (FCAC): Why and How” together with IOGT International, Thai Health Promotion Foundation, Third World Network, International Health Policy Program, Thailand and National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol (NATA), Sri Lanka. Dough Webb from UNDP moderated and GAPA Chair Sally Casswell held the main introduction in an event which also included the following speakers and panellists:

  • Professor Kumnuan, Thai Health/GAPA Board Member
  • Pubudu Sumanasekara, International Vice President, IOGT
  • International, GAPA Board member
  • Dr Palitha Abeykoon, NATA, Sri Lanka
  • Sanya Reid Smith, Third World Network
  • Øystein Bakke, GAPA
  • Tungamirai Zimonte, Board Member, IOGT International
  • Dr TRAN Tuan, Chairman Viet Nam Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention Alliance
  • Dr. Supreda, ThaiHealth, CE, Thai Health
  • Paula Johns, NCD Alliance Board Member, GAPA Board Member
  • Issah Ali, Executive Director, VALD
  • Robin Room, Researcher, La Trobe University, Melbourne

The room with a capacity of 50 people was overfilled; there were good presentations, active participation in group discussions and a good debate in the plenary.

In addition GAPA was involved as co-hosts in the side meeting “Advancing SAFER – the new WHO-led initiative to reduce alcohol related harm globally” together with United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on NCD, IOGT International, NCD Alliance and Vital Strategies.

Endorsments of Global Fund letter

In a joint open letter sent 1 February 2018 to the The Global Fund; GAPA, IOGT International and the NCD Alliance voiced deep concern and urged to immediately end the recently announced partnership with Heineken. The letter was endorsed by 93 organisations and networks (as of February 28, 2018). Read the letter here.

  1. ACT Health Promotion, Brazil
  2. Actis – Norwegian Policy Network on Alcohol and Drugs
  3. Alcohol Action New Zealand
  4. Alcohol and Drug Information Center (ADIC), Sri Lanka
  5. Alcohol Focus Scotland
  6. Alcohol Healthwatch, New Zealand
  7. Alcohol Justice, USA
  8. Alcohol Policy Network in Europe (APN)
  9. Alcohol Policy Youth Network (APYN), Europe
  10. AV-OG-TIL (Campaign network for alcohol free zones), Norway
  11. Blue Cross International
  12. Blue Cross Norway
  13. Blue Cross in Tchad
  14. Bolivian Network of People Living with HIV and AIDS (REDBOL)
  15. Civil Society Network on Substance and Drug Abuse (csnETsda), Nigeria
  16. Center for Youth Eduction (CEM), Bosnia and Herzegovina
  17. Council of Churches in Namibia
  18. DiGNIDAD Coalition, Philippines
  19. Dutch Institute for Alcohol Policy (STAP), Netherlands
  20. Drug Policy and Harm Reduction Platform, Malawi
  21. East African Alcohol Policy Alliance
  22. Emonyo Yefwe International, Kenya
  23. European Alcohol Policy Alliance (Eurocare)
  24. European Center for Monitoring Alcohol Marketing (EUCAM)
  25. European Public Health Alliance (EPHA)
  26. Estonian Temperance Union (AVE)
  27. FORUT, Germany
  28. FORUT, Norway
  29. Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), Australia
  30. Framework Convention on Global Health Alliance  (FCGH), Switzerland
  31. Ghana NCD Alliance
  32. Global Call to Action against Poverty (GCAP), Liberia
  33. Health and Trade Network (HaT)
  34. Health Related Information Dissemination Amongst Youth (HRIDAY), India
  35. Healthy Caribbean Coalition
  36. Healthy Lanka Alliance for Development, Sri Lanka
  37. Healthy Latin American Coalition (CLAS, Coalición Latinoamérica Saludable)
  38. Interamerican Heart Foundation
  39. International Network on Brief Interventions for Alcohol and other Drugs (INEBRIA)
  40. International Pediatric Association
  41. Institute for Alcohol Studies, UK
  42. Institute for Research and Development (UTRIP), Slovenia
  43. Institute of Leadership and Development (INSLA), Ghana
  44. IOGT Gambia
  45. IOGT Germany
  46. IOGT movement, Iceland
  47. IOGT Norway
  48. IOGT-NTO Movement, Sweden
  49. IOGT Poland
  50. Kawempe Youth Development Association (KYDA), Uganda
  51. League Against Intoxicants, Norway
  52. Lithuanian Tobacco and Alcohol Control Coalition (NTAKK)
  53. Milestones Rehabilitation Foundation, Nigeria
  54. National Council Against Smoking, South Africa
  55. NCD Alliance, Malawi
  56. NCD Alliance Lanka, Sri Lanka
  57. NCD Child
  58. New Dawn, Zambia
  59. New Vois Association of the Phils. Inc. (NVAP), Philippines
  60. Nepal NCD Alliance
  61. Nordic Alcohol and Drug Policy Network (NordAN), Northern Europe
  62. Norwegian Cancer Society
  63. Ohaha Family Foundation, Nigeria
  64. People Against Drug Dependence and Ignorance (PADDI), Nigeria
  65. Safe Sociable London Partnership, UK
  66. Students’ Campaign Against Drugs (SCAD), Kenya
  67. Slovenian Coalition for Public Health, Environment and Tobacco Control
  68. South African NCD Alliance
  69. Southern African Alcohol Policy Alliance- Zambia
  70. Southern African Alcohol Policy Alliance
  71. Stop Drink Network, Thailand
  72. Sri Lanka Alcohol Policy Alliance
  73. Teamcoby, Nigeria
  74. The Cancer Association of South Africa
  75. Salvation Army, Norway Iceland and The Faeroes
  76. The Wellbeing Initiative, Nigeria
  77. UDK Consultancy, Malawi
  78. UK Health Forum, United Kingdom
  79. United States Alcohol Policy Alliance
  80. Union for International Cancer Control (UICC)
  81. Vision for Alternative Development (VALD), Ghana
  82. Vital Strategies
  83. WEMOS, Netherlands
  84. West African Alcohol Policy Alliance
  85. Wimmera Drug Action Taskforce, Australia
  86. WomanHealth Philippines
  87. World Cancer Research Fund International (WCRF International)
  88. World Medical Association (WMA)
  89. World Stroke Organization
  90. World Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WWCTU)
  91. Women’s Coalition Against Cancer (WOCACA), Malawi
  92. Young Professionals Chronic Disease Network (YP-CDN)
  93. Zambia NCD Alliance